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High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) support in interhospital transport of critically ill children

Luregn J. Schlapbach| Jonas Schaefer| Ann-Maree Brady| Sara Mayfield| Andreas Schibler
Original
Volume 40, Issue 4 / April , 2014

Pages 592 - 599

Abstract

Purpose

Optimal respiratory support for interhospital transport of critically ill children is challenging and has been scarcely investigated. High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy has emerged as a promising support mode in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU), but no data are available on HFNC used during interhospital transport. We aimed to assess the safety of HFNC during retrievals of critically ill children and its impact on the need for invasive ventilation (IV).

Methods

This was a retrospective, single-centre study of children under 2 years old transported by a specialized paediatric retrieval team to PICU. We compared IV rates before (2005–2008) and after introduction of HFNC therapy (2009–2012).

Results

A total of 793 infants were transported. The mean transport duration was 1.4 h (range 0.25–8), with a mean distance of 205 km (2–2,856). Before introduction of HFNC, 7 % (n = 23) were retrieved on non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and 49 % (n = 163) on IV. After introduction of HFNC, 33 % (n = 150) were retrieved on HFNC, 2 % (n = 10) on NIV, whereas IV decreased to 35 % (n = 162, p < 0.001). No patients retrieved on HFNC required intubation during retrieval, or developed pneumothorax or cardiac arrest. Using HFNC was associated with a significant reduction in IV initiated by the retrieval team (multivariate OR 0.51; 95 % CI 0.27–0.95; p = 0.032).

Conclusions

We report on a major change of practice in transport of critically ill children in our retrieval system. HFNC therapy was increasingly used and was not inferior to low-flow oxygen or NIV. Randomized trials are needed to assess whether HFNC can reduce the need for IV in interhospital transport of critically ill children.

Keywords

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